THE WILSON SYSTEM®

A hyper speed composting system to transform unwanted organic material streams into a higher and better use. Each module of our system transforms over 20 metric tons per hour.

Garbage Factory

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

The Wilson System® is made up of 3 major systems:

MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEM

The material handling system is responsible for feeding waste into the autoclave and then the separation of Wilson fibre from other materials after processing.

THE WILSON SYSTEM®

The Wilson System® is an industrial-scale, modular, high speed composting system which converts over 20 metric tons per hour of organic material into a high energy content fiber (Wilson Fibre®) through the application of high-pressure steam and mechanical agitation.

PRODUCT PREPARATION SYSTEM

Depending on the end-use of the Wilson Fibre®, various downstream product preparation systems are employed: fiber dryers, pelletizers, pyrolysis systems, anaerobic digestors, gasifiers, paper-making, fermenters and others.

HARNESSING THE POWER OF REAL TIME INFORMATION.

Hughes Energy facilities allow for real-time reporting on waste characterization through a world-class dashboard business intelligence (BI) tool.

The Hughes Energy dashboard records the daily material analysis and other KPI’s of the Wilson System® such as cycle times, energy and water usage, GHG emissions and carbon savings.

Data analytics is a key to improving the makeup and use of unwanted organics and the carbon-reducing impact of the Wilson System and its products.

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Technical Overview of
The Wilson System®
History of Autoclaving
An old technology with a new purpose. 

A key component of our system is a steam autoclave.

The earliest use of the technology was a steam digester which was invented by French physicist Denis Papin in 1679.

The modern autoclave was invented by Charles Chamberland in 1879, a French microbiologist who worked with Louis Pasteur, to sterilize medical instruments.

 

Autoclaves have been used in large-scale industry for decades, and different autoclave enclosure designs have been developed to meet the demands of the user. Initially used in the textile, timber, food, sterilising and rubber industries; autoclaves are now essential technology in the advanced composites, aircraft industry, tire manufacturing, casting industries and organics recycling. 

As technology has progressed so has autoclave design, initially from basic riveted steam heated vessels to today’s vessels fabricated utilising the latest welding techniques with highly sophisticated computerised control systems.